palaeopedia:

The stone Nippon, Nipponites (1904)
Phylum : MolluscaClass : CephalopodaSubclass : AmmmonoideaOrder : AmmonitidaSuborder : AncyloceratinaSuperfamily : TurrilitaceaeFamily : NostoceratidaeGenus : NipponitesSpecies : N. mirablilis, N. bacchus, N. occidentais, N. sachaliensis
Late Cretaceous (70 Ma)
6 cm long (size)
Indo-Pacific ocean (map)
Nipponites is an extinct genus of heteromorph ammonites. The species of Nipponites (primarily N. mirabilis) are famous for the way their shells form “ox-bow” bends, resulting in some of the most bizarre shapes ever seen among ammonites.
The ecology of Nipponites, as with many other nostoceratids, is subject to much speculation.

And for things like this is why I love paleontology.

palaeopedia:

The stone Nippon, Nipponites (1904)

Phylum : Mollusca
Class : Cephalopoda
Subclass : Ammmonoidea
Order : Ammonitida
Suborder : Ancyloceratina
Superfamily : Turrilitaceae
Family : Nostoceratidae
Genus : Nipponites
Species : N. mirablilis, N. bacchus, N. occidentais, N. sachaliensis

  • Late Cretaceous (70 Ma)
  • 6 cm long (size)
  • Indo-Pacific ocean (map)

Nipponites is an extinct genus of heteromorph ammonites. The species of Nipponites (primarily N. mirabilis) are famous for the way their shells form “ox-bow” bends, resulting in some of the most bizarre shapes ever seen among ammonites.

The ecology of Nipponites, as with many other nostoceratids, is subject to much speculation.

And for things like this is why I love paleontology.

Reblogged from palaeopedia

amnhnyc:

We’re welcoming the weekend with Lonesome George.
Be among the first visitors to see the famous Pinta Island tortoise who was the last of his kind when he died in 2012. Lonesome George will be on display at the Museum till January 4, 2015, when he will be returned to Ecuador as part of that country’s national patrimony.
Interesting stories from the past week:
See the fossil finds from a recent expedition to the Gobi Desert.
Black widows are among the few spider species harmful to people.
In a "bachelor band" of bighorn sheep, horn and body size determine rank.
Watch a trailer for Jalanan, featured in the 2014 Margaret Mead Film Festival.
Have a wonderful weekend!

amnhnyc:

We’re welcoming the weekend with Lonesome George.

Be among the first visitors to see the famous Pinta Island tortoise who was the last of his kind when he died in 2012. Lonesome George will be on display at the Museum till January 4, 2015, when he will be returned to Ecuador as part of that country’s national patrimony.

Interesting stories from the past week:

Have a wonderful weekend!

Reblogged from amnhnyc

micdotcom:

Oxford scientists say the Yeti may actually exist — but it isn’t a primate

A team of geneticists from Oxford University published a study this week in the Proceedings Of The Royal Society B, detailing their analysis of 36 hair samples purportedly from yetis. Nearly all of them turned out to be from common mammals such as horses, cows and even people.

But two came back with with something interesting. Upon deeper analysis, these samples were shown to have a 100% genetic match with a prehistoric bear-like creature, which was thought to have disappeared in the Pleistocene period — and which very may well be “the biological foundation of the yeti legend.”

Read more | Follow micdotcom 

This makes sense, specially when you see bear skeletons that look like this:
Baby Cave Bear A baby cave bear.

Reblogged from adinthebrave

border-studies:

The first published image of the koala appeared in George Perry’s (1810) natural history work Arcana.[109] Perry called it the “New Holland Sloth” on account of its perceived similarities to the Central and South American tree-living mammals of genus Bradypus. His disdain for the koala, evident in his description of the animal, was typical of the prevailing early 19th-century British attitude about the primitiveness and oddity of Australian fauna:[110]
"… the eye is placed like that of the Sloth, very close to the mouth and nose, which gives it a clumsy awkward appearance, and void of elegance in the combination … they have little either in their character or appearance to interest the Naturalist or Philosopher. As Nature however provides nothing in vain, we may suppose that even these torpid, senseless creatures are wisely intended to fill up one of the great links of the chain of animated nature …".[111]

I love how it doesn’t look as “cute” as the real one and it also has a nose that looks like that of a tapir.

border-studies:

The first published image of the koala appeared in George Perry’s (1810) natural history work Arcana.[109] Perry called it the “New Holland Sloth” on account of its perceived similarities to the Central and South American tree-living mammals of genus Bradypus. His disdain for the koala, evident in his description of the animal, was typical of the prevailing early 19th-century British attitude about the primitiveness and oddity of Australian fauna:[110]

"… the eye is placed like that of the Sloth, very close to the mouth and nose, which gives it a clumsy awkward appearance, and void of elegance in the combination … they have little either in their character or appearance to interest the Naturalist or Philosopher. As Nature however provides nothing in vain, we may suppose that even these torpid, senseless creatures are wisely intended to fill up one of the great links of the chain of animated nature …".[111]

I love how it doesn’t look as “cute” as the real one and it also has a nose that looks like that of a tapir.

Reblogged from border-studies